Steph330
Posts: 4
Joined: May 20,2016

Sat Apr 14,2018 12:34 PM

Does the Hydrogen emission spectrum only occur in the ultraviolet region?

Since Hydrogen only has one electron, and its principal quantum number is 1. Does that mean every time the electron gets excited, it only drops back down to the first electron shell (its ground state), and produces lines in the ultraviolet region? Or can it drop for example from the third shell to the second shell, and produce lines in the visible region?

Thanks!
Gigi67
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2,2017

Sat Apr 14,2018 02:47 PM

Not sure if there’s a proper reason using chemistry but I can explain based on physics. So the emission spectrum is produced when electrons from an energy level fall to ground state, releasing energy and thus a wavelength of light
Gigi67
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2,2017

Sat Apr 14,2018 02:49 PM

The energy level is based on the number of shells of the electron. Since hydrogen only has one electron it should only be able to gain energy to excite itself into the first level (n=1). the other option is removing the electron completely but that’s not your q is it. Anyway, since it can only fall from n=1 the energy released is a fixed value. So it’s emission spectra is only based on the UV region

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